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Mead Lover's Digest #0488 Wed 3 July 1996

 

Forum for Discussion of Mead Making and Consuming
Dick Dunn, Digest Janitor

 

Contents:

Re: How much yeast is too much? (Fred Hardy)
Re: Mead Lover's Digest #487, 26 June 1996 ("Allen Dick")
Pumpkin wine and yeast (Douglas Thomas)
Rhodomel (sam_bennett@om.cv.hp.com)
nutrient/energizer (lprescot@sover.net)
Re: Large Batches of Mead (Mark Ottenberg)
Purple loosestrife (Jacob Galley)
Braggot, Am I close? (Jeff Smith)

 

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Subject: Re: How much yeast is too much?
From: Fred Hardy <fcmbh@access.digex.net>
Date: Thu, 27 Jun 1996 13:03:59 -0400 (EDT)

> Subject: How much yeast is too much?
> From: Broon <kuntzt@cps.acast.nova.edu>
> Date: Tue, 25 Jun 1996 12:05:05 -0400 (EDT)
>
> As a novice brewer brewing >5 gallon batches, I've been dividing my
> yeast proportionally but was wondering what if any adverse effects
> there might be to say putting 5 grams of yeast in a 2.5 or 3 gallon
> batch. Would it speed fermentation up, blow my lock through the roof,
> or leave lots of nasties in my mead?

You say you normally brew batches greater than 5 gallons, so I'm not quite
sure of your comment about dividing yeast. However, if you use 5 grams
of yeast in a 2 1/2 or 3 gallon batch you will be using about the correct
amount for a healthy fermentation. For 5 gallons you will be somewhat
underpitching if you use less than 7 grams (I'm assuming you mean dry
yeast). I recommend 7-10 grams for 5 gallons, with 10 grams being better
than 7.

Cheers, Fred


We must invent the future, else it will | <Fred Hardy>
happen to us and we will not like it. |
[Stafford Beer, "Platform for Change"] | email: fcmbh@access.digex.net


Subject: Re: Mead Lover's Digest #487, 26 June 1996
From: "Allen Dick" <allend@internode.net>
Date: Thu, 27 Jun 1996 11:21:05 -0600

> > I've been making mead in my 55 gallon honey drums for some years
> > and want to move to a better fermatation vessel. I am interested
> > in a poly, fiberglass or stainless in a volumn of 50 to 100 gal.
> > Anybody have any
> >info on what would be the best value in a vessel of this size and
> >where
> > one may possibly find it for sale?

I just picked up some 45 Imp Gallon poly juice drums for $10.50 each
(Canadian) form a canner of concentrated juices.

After cutting off the lid with a common saw, they are ideal. Just
cover with a sheet of plastic.

Check your supermarket for the local concentrated juice canner (read
labels) and give them a shout.

Regards

Allen

W. Allen Dick, Beekeeper VE6CFK
RR#1, Swalwell, Alberta Canada T0M 1Y0
Internet:dicka@cuug.ab.ca & allend@internode.net
Honey. Bees, & Art <http://www.internode.net/~allend/>


Subject: Pumpkin wine and yeast
From: Douglas Thomas <thomasd@uchastings.edu>
Date: Fri, 28 Jun 1996 14:14:00 -0700 (PDT)


I would like to make a pumpkin wine for next year's Hallowe'en. My
question is, what type of yeast? I was thinking about tokay, because I
want a slightly sweet wine. Would tokay ferment out at a low enough
alcohol level, to leave some sugar? I do not want a high alcohol, high
sugar wine, something more like 12% alcohol with about 3% residual sugar.
Suggestions can be posted or e-mailed
Thanks
Doug Thomas
thomasd@cheshire.oxy.edu


Subject: Rhodomel
From: sam_bennett@om.cv.hp.com
Date: Fri, 28 Jun 96 19:17:03 -0700


Item Subject: cc:Mail Text
>>Also, has anyone tried a rose mead?
>I've been thinking about making a rose hip mead for years now. I hear that
>rose hip wine is big in Germany.

I've made rose hip wine, and it was wonderful. I intend to start a rose
mead (rhodomel) as soon as I get enough roses away from my wife and her
rose beads. The wine was a medium dry with a very pleasant tartness from
the rose hips, I want to see how it will turn out as a slightly sweeter
mead.

Sam_Bennett@omserver2.cv.hp.com

"…to boldly go where no one has gone before."


Subject: nutrient/energizer
From: lprescot@sover.net
Date: Sun, 30 Jun 1996 09:24:56 -0400 (EDT)


I've been making meads for a few years now, and have picked up a fair amount
of information about yeast nutrient along the way. Recently I've read a lot
of references to yeast energizer, particularly with respect to use in tandem
with nutrient. I've always figured it was just a different set of salts and
other items than the Fermax I've been using. Is this actually something
different?

David Prescott

Shaftsbury, Vermont


Subject: Re: Large Batches of Mead
From: Mark Ottenberg <mao@clark.net>
Date: Mon, 1 Jul 1996 10:04:15 -0400 (EDT)


>——————————
>
>Subject: Tanks, etc.
>From: Fred Hardy <fcmbh@access.digex.net>
>Date: Mon, 24 Jun 1996 11:06:42 -0400 (EDT)
>
>
>Kirk wrote:
>
>> I've been making mead in my 55 gallon honey drums for some years and
>> want to move to a better fermatation vessel. I am interested in a poly,
>> fiberglass or stainless in a volumn of 50 to 100 gal. Anybody have any
>>info on what would be the best value in a vessel of this size and where
>> one may possibly find it for sale?
>>
>> Kind wishes,
>>
>> Sleeping Bear Apiaries/Kirk Jones
>> BeeDazzled Candleworks/Sharon Jones
>>
>> email b-man@aliens.com
>
Greetings,
Nice to make such nectar in such large batches, however, at least here in
the US, I think law restricts you to about 50 gallons of homebrew a year
unless you are a bonefied brewary, meadery, winery, etc. Doubt you will
find real troubles, but be forwarned. Then again, how are you managing to
drink over 1 gal a week? That has got to be a bit hard on the liver etc. …

  • – Mark, nanobrewer at

Old Yeller Meadery


Subject: Purple loosestrife
From: jgalley@tezcat.com (Jacob Galley)
Date: Mon, 01 Jul 1996 17:41:56 -0500


On my return from another excursion north into Wisconsin, I have found your many
messages about the dreaded purple loosestrife. This latest trip took us to
Bayfield and the Apostle Islands on Lake Superior. I do remember seeing many
stands of purple flowers that fit the descriptions posted here; in fact I was
struck by their prevalence. Along some highways, we would see a stand of
100-200 flowers every mile or less. Tall plants, with blossoms covering the top
six inches or so of the stem. Almost all were purple, with an occasional
albino-looking variant.

It is really a shame that they are so ecologically disruptive, because we
thought they were very pretty, and will probably be one of the things we
remember longest about this vacation.

On to mead: I think I'll make two (5 gallon) batches side-by-side. Both will
contain 5 lbs of alfalfa honey; one will contain the 5 lbs of purple loosestrip
[sic] honey that I bought in Door County, and the other will contrast this with
5 lbs of buckwheat honey that I'll buy locally. Then I'll know how the two
really compare. I'll let you-all know in a couple years.

Jake.


Subject: Braggot, Am I close?
From: snsi@win.bright.net (Jeff Smith)
Date: Tue, 2 Jul 1996 17:09:28 -0500 (CDT)


Howdy Mead Lovers,

I bottled the first mead I've made since subscribing to MLD and am looking
to my next mead impatiently. I've been thinking braggot.

So far my receipt looks like this (so far):

8 Lb. of honey (six lb. Sam's club, Two Lb. buckwheat or other strong honey)
5 lb. 2-row malt
4 oz dark Munich malt
2 oz coriander @ 5 minutes left in boil
1 pack ale yeast
1 pack wine yeast

Would this turn out close style wise?
Would the Munich push the malt flavor to far?
Any spices that would match the coriander?
Should I use hops?

Thanks for the time, Happy Fourth!

Jeff Smith | '71 HD Sprint 350SX, Temp '77 GS 400 X
snsi@win.bright.net | Barnes, WI



End of Mead Lover's Digest #488