Subject: Mead Lover's Digest #1088, 1 April 2004
From: mead-request@talisman.com


Mead Lover's Digest #1088 Thu 1 April 2004

 

Forum for Discussion of Mead Making and Consuming
Dick Dunn, Digest Janitor

 

Contents:

Edit the Subject line!! (Mead Lovers Digest)
Re: Bee Products ("Diekhaus & Greve")
Re: Mead Lover's Digest #1087, 30 March 2004 ("Lane O. Locke")
Re: Mead Lover's Digest #1087, 30 March 2004 (Steven Sanders)
Re: Mead Lover's Digest #1087, 30 March 2004 ("W. Andrews")
Re: Mead Lover's Digest #1087, 30 March 2004 (daniel kuczero)
Re: Mead Lover's Digest #1087, 30 March 2004 ("Dennis Key")
RE: Mead Lover's Digest #1087, 30 March 2004 ("Robert Farrell")
Re: Pyment using Alexanders Concentrate (Robert Sandefer)
Re: Summary of History of Fortified Mead Research (Melanie Moore)
three-pronged attack on meadmaking (Dick Dunn)

 

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Subject: Edit the Subject line!!
From: mead@talisman.com (Mead Lovers Digest)
Date: Thu, 1 Apr 2004 01:38:30 -0700 (MST)

C'mon, folks…there's 10 articles for this digest, and six of them have
subject lines that only reference the preceding digest. If you're going
to take the time to put an article in front of 1200 people, PLEASE take
the time to do battle with your mail program and figure out how to put a
meaningful subject on your mail. This is both for now and for posterity,
because those "Re: Mead Lover's Digest xyzzy" subjects are going to be
even less helpful (a) in the future and (b) when people make indexed
archives of the digest.
adthanksvance
Dick


Subject: Re: Bee Products
From: "Diekhaus & Greve" <gokuraku@po.harenet.ne.jp>
Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2004 10:07:18 +0900


> Subject: re:royal jelly/pollen ect
> From: Steven_Butcher@fpl.com
> Date: Mon, 29 Mar 2004 17:45:07 -0500

>

> >>>snip<<<<<
> > very interesting. royal jelly and pollen in mead. never heard of it. and
> > what is propolis? i know propolis is a bee product but not sure exactly
> > what it is or does. you have really sparked my interest. what do those
> > ingredients do and how do they impact the flavor of mead?
> <<<snip>>>>>

>

> The added pollen, royal jelly, and propolis is what Buhner reccomends as a
> modern way of reconstructing this mixture that preserves the benefits of
> the critical ingredients without being so destructive to the hive.
> <<<<snip>>>>
> thanks! very informative. i appreciate you taking the time to explain in
> such detail. i will surely looking into adding these ingredients to future
> batches of my own
> steve

> ———————————————————-

Try these links
http://www.apitherapy.org
http://www.apitherapy.com
to learn more about the bee products.
Pollen in Mead is good for your health! It was the drink that kept the
Vikings going over to America without getting scorbut or other diseases from
lack of nurishment.
Greetings from Japan
Gabi
http://www.amie.or.jp/daruma/daruma-new1.html


Subject: Re: Mead Lover's Digest #1087, 30 March 2004
From: "Lane O. Locke" <shaggyman@kc.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Mar 2004 20:12:57 -0600

I've had excellent results using can Alexanders and about 10-11 lbs honey in
five gallons. Just mix the honey with about two gallons hot (140-150 F)
water, add the juice and whatever else you are going to put in, then add
cold water until the desired initial gravity is reached (I use 1.100). Must
should then be just about the right temp for pitching.
Cabernet, Burgundy, and Merlot all yield a very drinkable pyment which
improves markedly in one year, amazingly in five years, and incredibly in
ten years.

Yum.

PS: If anyone still has a bottle of the '93 Shaggyman Garnet, I'm ready to
deal, and deal easy.

Shaggyman
Got MEAD?

> Subject: Pyment using Alexanders Concentrates
> From: "Craig Sturdivant" <csturdiv@hotmail.com>
> Date: Tue, 30 Mar 2004 20:36:05 +0000

>

> How much honey would I use with single can (I think they are 46 ounces) of
> concentrate from Alexanders? I am thinking of making a pyment cabernet and
> am not sure how much honey to use per gallon with the kit.


Subject: Re: Mead Lover's Digest #1087, 30 March 2004
From: Steven Sanders <geigertube@yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 30 Mar 2004 18:15:11 -0800 (PST)

> Also – another chocolate mead question

>

> On the site of the Liquid sex recipe, at the bottom a note was made that you
> could add chocolate syrup instead of powder. I found another baking site
> that has chocolate extract. What is your thoughts on adding pure extracts
> rather than powdered herbs to recipes? It would seem easier, just to add
> the liquid than measure spices, and the alchol in the extracts would be
> negligible (I would think). If you added the extracts to the secondary,
> the oils would break down with the alchol content of the mead. Wouldn't
> this be better all away around?

>

> Has anyone added extracts to their recipes?

Karen,

You're right. Good quality chocolate extract works
great. I'm of the opinion that using cocoa powder is a
big waste of time. I have not performed a taste
comparison of the two methods, however.

Star Kay from Dean and Deluca has worked well for me.
Just dump it in to taste after fermentation is over,
(I usually use the whole bottle, but start with
one-half and go from there) and let it settle out,
bottle and age. Good stuff. Usually really, really
good in an off-dry mead after 1/2 year.

Regards,

Steven


Subject: Re: Mead Lover's Digest #1087, 30 March 2004
From: "W. Andrews" <wiandrew@cs.indiana.edu>
Date: Tue, 30 Mar 2004 21:49:12 -0500


> Subject: Spices for Apple Pie Mead & Chocolate Mead Question
> From: "kalliope10" <kalliope10@swbell.net>
> Date: Thu, 25 Mar 2004 16:45:01 -0600

>

> On the site of the Liquid sex recipe, at the bottom a note was made that you
> could add chocolate syrup instead of powder. I found another baking site
> that has chocolate extract. What is your thoughts on adding pure extracts
> rather than powdered herbs to recipes? It would seem easier, just to add
> the liquid than measure spices, and the alchol in the extracts would be
> negligible (I would think). If you added the extracts to the secondary,
> the oils would break down with the alchol content of the mead. Wouldn't
> this be better all away around?

>

> Has anyone added extracts to their recipes?

>

> Skold,

>

> Karen

Just out of curiosity I tried making a 1-gallon batch of chocolate mead
with chocolate oils instead of real chocolate. At T+7 months, it's definitely
an experiment I wouldn't care to repeat. It's not even bitter, it's just too..
glossy tasting.

Ain't nothing like the real thing!

  • — WB

Subject: Re: Mead Lover's Digest #1087, 30 March 2004
From: daniel kuczero <sledaddict73@yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2004 04:49:35 -0800 (PST)

multiple yeasts….

Is it acceptable to pitch my second racking of mead
with a higher tolerant yeast than i initially used?
any feedback would be much appreciated!

sledaddict73


Subject: Re: Mead Lover's Digest #1087, 30 March 2004
From: "Dennis Key" <dione13@msn.com>
Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2004 10:54:34 -0700

To Phil about herbs: Try logging on to theherbstorenm.com. It's the
website for a store in Albuquerque, NM that either has or can frequently
get all kinds of esoteric herbs (legal, of course) for whatever use. I
called them (505-255-8878) and they will be happy to help you and any of
the rest of us find what we need.
Dennis Key


Subject: RE: Mead Lover's Digest #1087, 30 March 2004
From: "Robert Farrell" <bfarrell100@hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2004 10:39:30 -0800


>Subject: Spices for Apple Pie Mead & Chocolate Mead Question
>From: "kalliope10" <kalliope10@swbell.net>

>I added 1 1/2 tsp. Cinnamon (from Great Britian) 1/2 tsp. nutmeg (from GB also)
>1/4 Allspice and 1/4 tsp. ginger – these were all powdered.

>

>The must tasted just like an apple pie, but I'm wondering if I didn't add
>enough
>spices. Of course, when I rack to secondary, I will adjust for taste then.

If you decide to add spices to the secondary, I suggest you make a "tea"
with your powdered spices, run it through a coffee-type filter and then add
to the secondary rather than adding more powder directly to your mead.

Bob Farrell
Portland, OR


Subject: Re: Pyment using Alexanders Concentrate
From: Robert Sandefer <melamor@vzavenue.net>
Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2004 13:29:36 -0500

I have made a pyment (or a grape melomel as I like to call it) using 1
46-fl-oz can of Cabernet Sauvignon concentrate, 9.6 lbs crystalized clover
honey, water (17 quarts), and some additives (5 tsp yeast nutrient, 6 tsp
acid blend, .5 tsp grape tannin, 4 tsp bentonite, 5 Campden tablets).

This mixture was just over 5 gallons (~5.25 gal) and had an OG = 1.095
(and pH of 3.5).

This was fermented to 1.003 by a packet of Red Star Pasteur Champagne
yeast.

I haven't tasted the finished product yet but a tasting at one racking
showed promise with raisin, fruit, and alcohol notes and with both wine
and mead parts being present.

Hope this helps,
Robert Sandefer


Subject: Re: Summary of History of Fortified Mead Research
From: Melanie Moore <mellymel_hsv@yahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2004 12:05:05 -0800 (PST)

 

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Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

 

>Interestingly, The Whitehouse Cookbook, published sometime
>in the late 1860's, also mentions adding spirits to wines in order
>to improve the finished wine. These are what would be called
>"county wines," not necessarily wines made from the wine grape.
>It doesn't say anything about adding spirits to mead, however.
>Adding spirits to wine (the Whitehouse Cookbook says brandy
>is a good choice) seems to be a fairly well known technique among
>winemakers up through the 1800's, I would guess.

I just finished devouring "Making Mead" by Duncan and Acton, and the
whole last 3 or 4 pages deal with several old-recipe honey drinks with the
addition of rums, scotches and as you said, brandys. Some called bishops,
a medieval nightcap, lots of mulled drinks where one of the main ingredients
is honey, but you add some sort of wine, port or liquor to it (as well as
tons of spices). Very fascinating sounding drinks (and some of them down
right sickly). It was also noted that a lot of taverns (particularly in
the winter months) would serve these mulled bishops and such where there was
an addition to a mead-like base, some other sort of liquor, and that if you
were well known in the particular tavern, you were able to create your own.
So apparently it is not unheard of to add wines and liquors to meads.

Just thought I'd chime in and add a little of my newly found knowledge.
By the way, Making Mead was an incredibly entertaining read. Although
not very in depth, it gives a colorful history of mead and mead making,
and several very good recipes. A great basic book (and only 60 pages)
to get someone (like me) started. I'm finishing a candlemaking book now,
and will move on to The Compleat Meadmaker by Schramm this weekend (just
thumbing through it this morning, I see that it will be much more in depth,
and the perfect next step I believe). Thanks for all the suggestions for
reading sources, they've been thoroughly enjoyable thus far!

As for my first mead, I've decided on a very simple cyser. It seems this
will be an easier mead to keep balanced for my first time out. Thanks for
all the help and suggestions!!

Love and Light,

Mel


Subject: three-pronged attack on meadmaking
From: rcd@talisman.com (Dick Dunn)
Date: Thu, 1 Apr 2004 01:02:03 -0700 (MST)


It hurts to have to write this, because so much of it is happening so close
to home, but I think you folks need to know what is going on.

Several politically-motivated groups have formed a bizarre alliance which
is set to challenge beekeeping, production of honey, and (obviously, by
extension) mead-making in the US.

As some of you may know, Longmont Colorado is the home of the National
Honey Board (see www.nhb.org). Longmont is in northern Boulder County.
Longmont is also home for the office of US Rep Marilyn Musgrave (R), the
initiator of the proposed "Musgrave Amendment" to the US Constitution,
concerning same-sex marriages. Further, Longmont is home to many
agricultural workers, and hence is rightly sensitive to the ongoing
concerns of poor working conditions and taking advantage of these workers.
To the southwest, Boulder (the county seat) is a strongly activist,
liberal community with a vocal vegan contingent. You might well wonder
what these could have to do with one another! Read on…

Vegans oppose honey production, because it is said to exploit bees.

Regulations concerning mead production and licensing of meaderies are
closely connected to the fact that honey (like grapes) is an agricultural
product. Colorado's "Limited Winery" license category is carefully tied
to this, and thus to the legislative intent to encourage agriculture.

Well, the Boulder vegans have figured out that if honey is an agricultural
product, the bees must be agricultural workers, and by golly they're beeing
oppressed. They are also, clearly, undocumented. So the Boulderites want
to protest honey production. The protests are being organized by the
People for Ethical Treatment of Apis mellifera. Local radio stations are
carrying a spot featuring a re-mixed version of the Beatles rendition of
the Carl Perkins tune "Honey Don't".

On another front, unfortunately a little knowledge is a dangerous thing:
Information made available on the social aspects of beehives has come to
the attention of supporters of the Musgrave Amendment. They've figured
out that–with one queen, a few hundred male drones, and tens of thousands
of female workers–a beehive is a long way from having monogamous male-female
relationships! One member of Longmont's largest fundamentalist church
(located on–I am not making this up!–North Gay Street) commented "people
better start thinking twice before they teach their kids about the birds
and THE BEES!!" Given this understanding of how beehives work, it appears
that there will be legislation introduced to ban demonstration hives being
shown in schools. It may go as far as prosecuting beekeepers under
existing "soliciting" statutes.

And what of mead? Well, take all this turmoil about honey production, and
add to it that the bees are being "exploited" to help produce intoxicating
beverages!! If you want to raise a red herring up a flagpole and see if
anybody salutes, use a drunken herring. It's a mess, I tell you. And note
that there are two meaderies in Boulder County. The big one is Redstone,
but conservative folks are wondering if there isn't some hidden reference
to "stoned" and they've been trying to put the bottle labels in their CD
players to look for backward masking. The smaller meadery is in a town
named Niwot, which is an Arapahoe Indian word meaning left-handed, so of
course that's got the right wing in a tizzy, and you know even Simon and
Garfunkel sang "…nearly branded a communist 'cause I'm left-handed."
Meanwhile the liberals think that the whole town of Niwot is making fun
of them, plus they can't decide whether they should like mead or not
because they can't find anyone to tell them whether they should like it.

What will it come to? Will there be protests? Let's defend mead! Call it
a bee-in!

Dick Dunn rcd@talisman.com Hygiene, Colorado USA


End of Mead Lover's Digest #1088