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Dry vs Liquid yeast

brian92fs

NewBee
Registered Member
Jul 24, 2011
323
0
0
Sacramento, CA
I subscribe to a newsletter from The Electric Brewery. For those beer brewers out there, this was an interesting forum post on dry vs liquid yeasts. In summary, the brewer who did the test couldn't tell the different in the end. This refutes advice we often hear that that liquid yeasts produce a better product than dry yeasts. Of course, its only one strain and one test. But still interesting.
 

Riverat

Premium Patron
Premium Patron
Been making beer for a long time, I will say that at one time the liquid did have an edge over dry but that isn't the case any longer with a lot of ales and they are coming up with some surprisingly decent dry lager as well....ah for a true dry Czech pils!
 

akueck

Certified Mead Mentor
Certified Mead Mentor
Jun 26, 2006
4,958
10
0
Ithaca, NY
The advantage (IMO) to liquid cultures is the variety available. Basic strains (generic American and British ale, generic lagers, etc) are available in both dry and liquid, in which case it's cheaper to go with dry and personally I don't think the result is any different. But there are lots of "specialty" strains that are only available in liquid.
 

BBBF

NewBee
Registered Member
May 19, 2008
585
0
0
41
Chicago, Land of Corruption
The advantage (IMO) to liquid cultures is the variety available. Basic strains (generic American and British ale, generic lagers, etc) are available in both dry and liquid, in which case it's cheaper to go with dry and personally I don't think the result is any different. But there are lots of "specialty" strains that are only available in liquid.
I was going to say the same thing. I use dry yeast exclusively, but there are more options in liquid. I might give them a shot eventually, but I am still working my way through the catalog of dry yeast.
 

akueck

Certified Mead Mentor
Certified Mead Mentor
Jun 26, 2006
4,958
10
0
Ithaca, NY
The specialty strains are worth it, if you're making a specific or special beer. I've done a few similar batches with either a liquid strain or a dry strain and the result is obviously very different. Usually it's the Continental styles that have a yeast-driven profile that necessitate one of the liquid cultures. Those beers are really hard to do well with a generic yeast.
 

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