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floating raisins or sinking raisins?

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Zagor

NewBee
Registered Member
Aug 31, 2005
11
0
0
Hello all,
the raisins I've put into the must as nutrients have always been floating until now (one week). I did not chop them when I started my batch. Would it have been better to chop them, in order to make them sink in the must and give away their nutrients, or is it good like I did anyway?
Thank you
Zagor
 

Oskaar

Got Mead Partner
Administrator
Dec 26, 2004
7,874
5
0
31
The OC
Whenever I use fruit a hack the kaypok out of it to release the nutrients as much as possible. This makes it easier for the yeast to get to the nitrogen it needs.

Cheers,

Oskaar
 

Brewbear

NewBee
Registered Member
May 10, 2005
959
0
0
I generally chop the dickens out of them...now! On my first batch of Ancient Orange I left them whole and it was O.K.
Chopping them will increase the surface contact area and the yeasties get what they need more readely. As for the floating vs. sinking, it is like a submarine race. They'll float to the surface and after a while they'll sink.

Ted
 

Dan McFeeley

Lifetime Patron
Lifetime GotMead Patron
Oct 10, 2003
1,897
5
38
65
Illinois
It's definitely best to chop them. Remember, the skin of any fruit is intended (among other things) to keep nasties out. Chopping exposes the innards all the more readily to the hungry yeasties.
 
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