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Opinions on Honey for Honey Brown Ale

Patchez

NewBee
Registered Member
Jun 24, 2009
7
0
0
York, PA
I was wondering what honey to use fro a Honey Brown I'm planning to brew this weekend.

My thoughts were clover, first because of easy accessability.

Further thought led to Mesquite or Buck wheat. Reason for these where, I've never tried Mesquite honey and really want to try it, as for the buckwheat I thought it's heavier flavor would add a little balance to the sweetness of the malts.

Thoughts?
 

Patchez

NewBee
Registered Member
Jun 24, 2009
7
0
0
York, PA
Brew Mutt's Honey Brown

7 lbs Amber malt extract
2 lbs Honey-- any kind

1/2 lb Crystal malt 60L
1/4 lb Chocolate malt
1/4 lb Honey malt

1 1/2 oz Kent Goldings - bittering (10HBU)
1/2 oz Kent Goldings - Finishing

Safale S04 English ale yeast

Boil the malts, add the extract at 170 degrees, bring to full boil add the bittering hops.

Boil for 45 minutes

Add the honey, boil for 10 minutes

Add the finishing hops, boil for 3 minutes

Cool

Top off with cool water to make 5 gallons, pitch the yeast when temp gets below 75 degrees.
 

AToE

NewBee
Registered Member
Jun 8, 2009
4,066
3
0
Calgary AB Canada
Boil the grains?!?! You sure about that?

Anyways, buckwheat makes a great braggot, so I'm sure in smaller amounts it would work well too.
 

commonsenseman

Worker Bee
Registered Member
Mar 23, 2011
150
0
16
As AToE said, I'd edit it slightly.

Bring water to 155, steep grains for 20 minutes.

Bring water to boil, turn off heat, add Malt Extract stirring vigorously, bring water back to a boil.

Continue as normal with boil.
 

AToE

NewBee
Registered Member
Jun 8, 2009
4,066
3
0
Calgary AB Canada
Yeah, the key thing is making sure those grains aren't still in the water for the boil! Unless it's some really rare technique to get a super bitter tanniny beer?
 

Meriadoc

NewBee
Registered Member
Jul 6, 2005
204
0
0
54
In addition to what folks have said so far, please allow me to add this -- your honey doesn't really need to be boiled: that seems to be an artifact of the beer brewing state of mind. Instead, you'll preserve more of the character of your honey (whether it's a buckwheat, orange blossom, or even a clover or wildflower) if you simply pour it into the fermentation bucket (along with some water, and stir vigorously), and then add the cooled wort to the diluted honey.

Any good honey will provide a taste benefit over a cheap honey -- I would try both mild-flavored (clover, wildflower) and robust (buckwheat) in separate batches, so that you have the opportunity to decide for yourself.

My advice? If you cool the wort and then add it to diluted honey, then even a nice clover or whildflower honey will providee some very nice flavor and aroma.

Good luck!
 

AToE

NewBee
Registered Member
Jun 8, 2009
4,066
3
0
Calgary AB Canada
Thanks for pointing that out, I'd missed that the honey was intended to be boiled. Skipping that is definitely a good way to improve on the honey character in the final product.
 

morgancooper

NewBee
Registered Member
Jan 31, 2013
1
0
0
Health and Fitness

Yes, you may try some natural honey with your recipes as it makes you more healthy and fit.
 

Marshmallow Blue

NewBee
Registered Member
From what I've read on bee folks, the buck wheat honey has a lot of molasses flavors. I think that the buckwheat will merge nicely with a beer because of this. Or you could go for something where the honey can shine on its own. I'd go for the mesquite. It's lighter in color but I find it to be pretty bold. In fact. Ill be bochet-ing some when a carboys clears up.

So yeah, I think your honey selection should consider what kind of position you want the honey to play.
 

theEnvoy

NewBee
Registered Member
Oct 25, 2012
127
0
0
North East Georgia
Ditto to everyone's comments on boiling the Honey. I added one pound of honey to the boil of a brown ale, and all it did was dry the beer out -- no honey flavor whatsoever. It did, however, amp up the alcohol content. But the beer was too dry. I will try adding honey to the ferment bucket on another batch, but will need to consider that it should lengthen the ferment process. Beers typically ferment out around two weeks, give or take, and honey should take a bit more. Just stick with your hydrometer techniques. Another thing to consider -- add one pound of Gambrinous Honey Malt to your steep grains, it adds body and a nice honey flavor to the beer. I would do this in addition to the honey addition to the ferment bucket.
 

phineascoates

NewBee
Registered Member
Mar 10, 2013
11
0
0
Yes, you may try some natural honey with your recipes as it makes you more healthy and fit.
I think honey is one of the best recipe for making a beer and I consider this as a good flavor. Actually, I am planning to make a beer and I am using the honey I hope I can make good taste.
 

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