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Reducing the perceived sweetness of mead

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rb2112br

Worker Bee
Registered Member
Mar 27, 2018
111
1
18
What is the best way to reduce the perceived sweetness level of a mead, preferably with minimal affect on the taste? I was shooting for a sweet, high ABV (~19%), hibiscus mead (similar to Viking Blod). The SG was 1.157 and it has been stuck at 1.052 for a month or two despite efforts to get it started again. I think it has good flavor with a slight alcohol burn to it, but it is very sweet. It's not cloyingly sweet, but still sweet (if that makes any sense). At this point, I would just like to maybe add something that will make it taste a little less sweet than it really is so that I can stabilize it and let it age for a while.
 

Squatchy

Lifetime GotMead Patron
Lifetime GotMead Patron
Nov 3, 2014
5,171
19
38
Denver
Acid additions, see my post on that,, look it up
tannins, Look for gual tannins first and then grape tannins
oak. these are other types of tannins
 

rb2112br

Worker Bee
Registered Member
Mar 27, 2018
111
1
18
I was looking at oak, but of all the stuff I've heard or read about oak, I couldn't find anything that specifically said which species of oak or what toast level works best for reducing the perception of sweetness.
 

Squatchy

Lifetime GotMead Patron
Lifetime GotMead Patron
Nov 3, 2014
5,171
19
38
Denver
I was looking at oak, but of all the stuff I've heard or read about oak, I couldn't find anything that specifically said which species of oak or what toast level works best for reducing the perception of sweetness.
I have a full episode of podcast about oaking On 8/29/17 or very close to that. Or you can also look up a thread called Wood Management.
 
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