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Show us your Stems

NeadMead

NewBee
Registered Member
Mar 2, 2006
93
0
0
46
Summersolstice, please forgive my ignorance, but what is the importance of coating the horn in bee's wax? I am not trying too be sarcastic; I honestly do not know, but I am curios in case I can get ahold of one.

May the gods grant you great brews,
Gerald
 

Oskaar

Got Mead Partner
Administrator
Dec 26, 2004
7,874
5
0
31
The OC
Howdy,

My understanding is that the wax helps to maintain a "waterproof/leakproof" container, prevent fouling of the mead by the taste of horn (I've drank out of an uncoated horn and won't ever do so again), and generally preserve the integrity of your mead for more advantageous quaffing.

In my opinion the only drawbacks are:

Wax smell and taste imparted to the mead (I've quaffed from more than one horn coated with different types of what was supposed to be neutral)

The actual smell of the horn itself. I just have a hyper-sensitive schnozola and have learned to trust in it.

Glass stems are neutral in taste, aroma, and touch, they provide the best medium to view the appearance of the mead, they concentrate and accentuate the aroma of the mead more markedly and efficiently, they provide an ideal medium to aerate the mead in order to release the full bouquet and flavor profile of the mead as you drink, and they really allow the mead to put it's best foot forward for evaluation.

That's my story and I'm sticking to it! LOL

Cheers,

Oskaar
 

NeadMead

NewBee
Registered Member
Mar 2, 2006
93
0
0
46
Thanks a bunch, Oskaar. I was just curious as I am not a connoisseur or afficianado. Yet I am going to give a review on the first two meads I ever drank which was this past weekend. I just hope that it is not condemned as "shoddy at best". My review article. The meads were great.

May the gods grant you great brews,
Gerald
 

Summersolstice

Lifetime Patron
Lifetime GotMead Patron
Aug 14, 2005
173
0
0
Central Nebraska, USA
Just as Oskaar says, the beeswax is simply a coating to prevent contamination from the raw horn. The wax does indeed impart off flavors, and to me, especially smells, to the mead. I never drink mead from this horn at any setting other than SCA camping events, and only then as a cultural statement as part of my Norse personna. When I'm at home I have one favorite glass I use - a sort of short-stemmed Bordeaux/Cabernet glass with a local winery logo on it.