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My First Label - Ancient Orange

Oskaar

Got Mead Partner
Administrator
Dec 26, 2004
7,874
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The OC
Hey Cheshire Cat,

One thing to be aware of is that yeast does produce sulfites during fermentation. Certain yeasts such as EC-1118 can produce as much as 50 ppm (which can trigger reactions in people that are sensitive to sulfites). Point is that I've taken to labeling all of my bottles "Contains naturally occuring sulfites" in order to let people with those sensitivies make their own decision as to whether they drink it or not.

Cheers,

Oskaar
 

CheshireCat

NewBee
Registered Member
Feb 21, 2005
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Really? My girlfriend is allergic to sulfates, which is why I started making mead in the first place. Is there anyway to know how much the yeast produces? Would it be considerably lower than, say, beer?
 

Oskaar

Got Mead Partner
Administrator
Dec 26, 2004
7,874
6
0
31
The OC
It varies from yeast strain to yeast strain. If you go to the yeast reference chart link you'll see which ones are indicated as high H2S, and SO2 producers:

http://www.lallemandwine.us/products/yeast_chart.php

EC is listed low on the chart, but that is definately not the case since in their own writeup on EC they say it produces up to 30 ppm, and that's been updated in this year's fermentation handbook to 50 ppm by Scott Laboratories.

Cheers,

Oskaar
 

Viking Brew Vessels - Authentic Drinking Horns